Bible Study

Bible Study how does the Bible Teach us to Deal with Anger



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Anger is the strongest of all human emotions, a common and unavoidable emotion that is a natural, almost automatic response to emotional or physical injury, mistreatment or opposition, resulting in a desire to strike out at something or someone.
Anger can be constructive or destructive.

"He who is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit than he who takes a city." (Proverbs 16:32)

Slow to anger.
Easier said than done, for anger is a common, often unavoidable, and almost automatic response to emotional or physical injury, mistreatment or opposition, resulting in a desire to hit out at something or someone.

But remember:
People who fly into a rage always make a bad landing.

While the English language knows a variety of words related to anger, (indignation, rage, fury, ire and wrath) Biblical Hebrew and Greek express the diversity even more.

Jonah didn't like God's plan with Nineveh, and burned of anger.
Moses asked God not to wipe out the unbelieving Israelites in the desert (in His fierce wrath).
Jealousies and outbursts of wrath show a more agitated condition of anger.
It quickly blazes up and quickly subsides. Paul warns the Galatians against it.
The Psalmist says to be angry, (quiver with strong emotion) but not sin.
The Corinthians were moved with indignation, very much grieved, in physical pain, irritated and annoyed.
The religious establishment was very angry ("Cholao") that Jesus healed on the Sabbath. This Greek word relates to gall, bile, and is metaphorically used to signify bitter anger, to be enraged.
"Wrath" means heat, rage, anger, poison and venom, describing a strong emotional state, resulting in rage. This is the dangerous version of anger, for it inflames everybody who comes close. That's why Rebekah advised Jacob to stay away from Esau.
Solomon adviced how best to response to rage,
"A soft answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger." (Proverbs 15:1)

"But now you yourselves are to put off all these: anger, wrath" (Colossians 3:8).
We know it, try to live it, and often fail miserably.
But take heart: "A sin recognized is half corrected".

Be angry, and do not sin
Hey, this is great! We are allowed to be angry, but not to sin.
1. How? Dealing with our anger before we go to bed, helps our emotions to stay on the "safe" side. And we sleep better too. No revenge is so complete as forgiveness.



And with God's help, we may strife to act according to Hebrews 12:14,
"Let it be your ambition to live at peace with all men."



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